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99.8% of Dairy Products in China Passed Recent Spot Checks

2018-10-25 10:23 Thursday


In September 2018, the State Administration for Market Regulation released the notification on food quality spot checks in the second quarter of 2018. According to the notification, the overall pass rate for food samples was 97.5% in the second quarter of 2018; the rate for dairy products and infant formula was 99.8% and 99.7%, respectively.

dairy products

Over that time period the government completed inspecting more than 525,000 food samples in total. 512,159 of the samples were qualified, and 13,100 samples were disqualified. Among them were 10,334 samples of dairy products, among which 10,309 samples qualified, and 2,452 samples of infant formula, of which only eight samples failed to qualify. The results from the latest three spot checks (May 22nd, August 21st, and September 4) were all satisfactory.

The three leading problems present in the samples were excessive use of food additives, microbial contamination and pesticide residues, accounting respectively for 30.3%, 25.3% and 22.3% of samples that failed to quality. Compared with last year, fewer food samples contained quality indicators that failed to meet standards, and the presence of non-edible substances continued to decline. The inspection of dairy and infant formula products included testing for 63 indicators, such as protein, fat, linoleic acid, vitamin and salmonella.

Present in multiple samples of infant formula that did not pass the spot checks was nucleotide, a natural component of breast milk, and important structural unit of DNA and RNA, which acts as a carrier of human genetic information. Infants and young children are at a stage of rapid development, where cells divide quickly and require large amounts of nucleotides.

The results from recent spot checks indicate that national food safety regulations have been strengthened, and that the quality of domestic dairy products and infant formula in China is steadily improving.

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